Wheelchair and scooter assessments - Driving Mobility

Wheelchair and scooter assessments

There is a great variety of equipment to enable individuals to be mobile. Some mobility centres are able to provide assessments to advise which type of wheelchair or scooter will best suit your needs. The centres can also advise how your equipment can be lifted into a vehicle.

There is a great variety of equipment to enable individuals to be mobile. Some mobility centres are able to provide assessments to advise which type of wheelchair or scooter will best suit your needs. The centres can also advise how your equipment can be lifted in to a vehicle.

Wheelchair or scooter assessments will include the following:

  • Understanding of your current mobility
  • Current medical history and eyesight
  • Height, weight and seated measurements
  • Understanding your seating and comfort requirements
  • Where the equipment will be used? How far you would like to travel?
  • How will the equipment be transported?
  • Understanding your ability to self-propel or drive equipment?
  • Will you be assisted? Understanding your carers’ needs?
  • How will you access or fund equipment?
  • Trial of equipment

Common types of manual (non-powered) wheelchairs

  • Attendant push: a chair intended to be pushed by a carer, tends to have small rear wheels
  • Self-propelling: a chair intended for occupant to push themselves, would have larger rear wheels
  • Tilt-in space: a chair that offers greater postural support, where the occupant’s position can be changed.
  • Active user: Lightweight chairs which are designed to increase the independence of the user.

Powered wheelchairs and scooters

  • Powered wheelchair: motorised wheelchair driven by the occupant most commonly with a joystick.
  • Small scooters: lighter weight scooters that can be folded to load in to a vehicle with weight limits typically no more than 135kg. Suitable for indoors and pavements only.
  • Medium scooters: sturdier scooters, designed to travel further and may have larger weight limits. May be more difficult to load in a car. Some will be considered as Class 3 and if registered can be used on the road. (Please see Highway code)
  • Large scooters: Designed to travel longer distances. Class 3 and if registered can be used on the road.

Useful links

Please see Highway Code. Rules for users of powered wheelchairs and mobility scooters (36 to 46) Rules for powered wheelchairs and mobility scooters, including on pavements and on the road. (https://www.gov.uk/guidance/the-highway-code/rules-for-users-of-powered-wheelchairs-and-mobility-scooters-36-to-46)

RiDC Mobility Scooters (https://www.ridc.org.uk/features-reviews/out-and-about/choosing-wheelchair/mobility-scooters)

RiDC Types of Powered Wheelchairs (https://www.ridc.org.uk/features-reviews/out-and-about/choosing-wheelchair/getting-powered-wheelchair/types-powered)