Multiple Sclerosis - Driving Mobility

Multiple Sclerosis

MS is a life-long neurological condition that can affect the brain and spinal cord. MS is one of the most common causes of disability in younger adults and women are more likely to experience the condition than men. More than 130,000 people in UK are living with MS.

MS is a life-long neurological condition that can affect the brain and spinal cord. MS is one of the most common causes of disability in younger adults and women are more likely to experience the condition than men. More than 130,000 people in UK are living with MS.

It can cause a wide range of potential symptoms, including:

  • fatigue
  • difficulty walking
  • vision problems, such as blurred vision
  • problems controlling the bladder
  • numbness or tingling in different parts of the body
  • muscle stiffness and spasms
  • problems with balance and co-ordination
  • problems with thinking, learning and planning

Depending on the type of MS you have, your symptoms may come and go in phases or get steadily worse over time.

If you have been diagnosed with MS, then the DVLA and your insurance company must be informed. It is essential to ensure your vision is monitored to comply with legal requirements for driving.

Each person will experience different symptoms and the effect on driving will therefore be different. The symptoms may affect your driving in a range of ways difficulty steering, use of pedals, processing information and getting in and out of a vehicle. At a Mobility Centre all aspects of driving and access to vehicles can be assessed. If you use a wheelchair or walking aid the Mobility Centres can also advise about how best to lift equipment into a vehicle.

Useful Links

The MS Society : Driving and DVLA (https://www.mssociety.org.uk/care-and-support/everyday-living/getting-around/driving-and-dvla)